"Love What You Do" - Maybe You Should Consider Becoming a Tradie

By Becky Rapson | Posted: Friday June 30, 2017

Travel opportunities, limited debt, job satisfaction and no office. This is the life of a tradie, and they love it. 

While many people head off to Uni as they leave high school, spending three years doing a degree and maybe getting a job at the end of that with a student loan they need to pay back; there are 21 young men who won't be doing such a thing.  Those 21 young men will be debt free, have a qualification in a career that they love and already earning a full-time wage by the time three years is over. 

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment predicts there will be over $30 billion of construction activity per year for the foreseeable future. This a sign that the construction industry is becoming more stable and sustainable. 2017 has been predicted as the peak of activity, with the tail-off following this peak being flatter and slower than previous construction peaks, meaning more construction over a longer period. This is good news for anyone looking for work in the trades in 2017 and beyond, either as a short or long term option. 

So what does this mean for Gateway? It means we are in a great position to be sending students out into the trades workforce. Students get a feel for the industry before they commit to an apprenticeship, they make connections in the trades community, and if they work hard to prove themselves they might be lucky enough to find themselves in the fortunate position of an apprenticeship at the end of their time in the programme. You have to be committed, prepared to put in a hard day's work and often in the cold and wet. It takes dedication, commitment and grit but if you are good with your hands and love seeing the rewards of your labour in a physical product then this may be the industry for you. 

Aside from the employment opportunities in the current market trades give you the chance to travel the world. Once you’re a qualified tradie, the world is your oyster. Skills in the trades will never go out of style – so if you’ve got ambitions of working overseas one day, being a tradie can make it happen. There is also the added benefit of the lack of an office. Not being stuck behind a desk and being active all day is becoming a popular trend, and getting around from site to site allows you to meet new people all the time. 

As a tradie, your work is always tangible. At the end of the day, you can stand back, put your hands on your hips, and look at what you’ve constructed, installed, unclogged, repaired, welded, painted...you get the idea. You think creatively and solve problems big and small – which feels pretty satisfying. Not only does manual work promote mental wellbeing, it makes you feel more productive, and even relieves stress.

The Gateway class of 2017 know too well the benefits of becoming a tradie, 90% of the Gateway students are exploring the industry this year. They are passionate young men who have a goal in sight; they know they want to get out into the world and be successful as soon as possible. They get stuck in and get their work done because they know that showing a good work ethic both on site and on paper is how you get the job. The results of their hard work are already looking promising with a number of students in line for employment in 2018 - and it is only July. Some of the students are already working towards their trades qualification while at school. It is their love for the trades that keeps them motivated, and they are proud to go to work each week and do what they love.

As Steve Jobs said "Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking." So if you're still looking for that something that you love to do, and you like the sound of travel opportunities, limited debt, job satisfaction and no office, have you considered becoming a tradie? 


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